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Monday April 21st 2014

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Power List: Mentors

We asked the members of the 2011 IN Power List who their mentors are.

Fred Donovan: W. H. Baskerville, a 57-year-old experienced professional engineer who developed his business skills during the Great Depression of the ‘30s. He was the only person who would hire me when I wanted to move back to Pensacola in 1964. He gave me a wonderful opportunity along with a corresponding 30-percent pay cut, then he went about the business of “forging a community-focused engineer from the raw technical meat that Georgia Tech produces.” (his words not mine).

Ron Fields: John Davis

Carol Carlan: I have many mentors, some living some not. I divide my goals into seven areas: spiritual, relationships, wealth and financial fitness, health and physical fitness, career, professional development/education and community. I have at least two mentors in each category at all times who I seek personal advice from, along with a mastermind advisory group of close personal friends who care about my success.

Rev. Lonnie Wesley, III: My father, L. D. Wesley Sr.

Keith Gregory: All my employees at Cox

Bentina Terry: My mom and pops. I cannot begin to tell you what they’ve been through—from  poor upbringing, out-of-wedlock kids, and other family issues to a career solider and successful businessman and my mom going to school, eventually getting her B.A. at 46, her M.B.A. at 54 and elected to the local school board at 68. They are phenomenal folks, and I hope I can be half as good as they are.

John Peacock: John Beuerlein, partner with Edward Jones in St. Louis

Jim Donatelli: Personally, my dad (Jim Donatelli) and father-in-law (Norm Poole), who taught me work ethic, drive, depth of character and personal integrity. Career, Mario Neal, a former boss who gave me my first opportunity to lead in a top 20 bank and always supported and challenged me. Locally, Mort O’Sullivan and Buzz Ritchie, who invited me to get involved and helped to introduce me to the community.

Sandy Sansing: My dad

Ashton Hayward: My father, who I saw had the respect of all his employees and who taught me to be humble, listen and be grateful. Politically, Rick Baker has been a big influence and Joe Scarborough, who gave me very good input before I committed to running.