Pensacola, Florida
Monday December 22nd 2014

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Buzz 8/4/11

HAYWARD BRINGS IN A MARINE Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward has hired Bill Reynolds, 45, as the city’s first Chief Administrative Officer.

Reynolds is an Illinois native who is an attorney with a master’s from Harvard University and an extensive background in the public sector. He worked as the press secretary to senior U.S. Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, and later became the senator’s Chief of Staff and Director of Communications.

His latest role was serving as Deputy County Administrator and Chief Operations Officer for Washtenaw County, Michigan, where he was tasked with providing leadership, oversight and management to 18 departments and supervising the daily operations of over 1,300 employees. Prior to being named Deputy County Administrator, he served as the County Administrator for Chippewa County, Wisconsin from 2007 to 2010.

Following law school, Bill served as a prosecutor in the United States Marine Corps and tried over 200 criminal cases in federal court prior to becoming the senior legal advisor to the 1st Marine Division. In 1998, he was recognized as the Marine Corps’ nominee for both the American Bar Association Military Attorney of the Year, and the Federal Bar Association Attorney of the Year.

In 2004, Bill took a leave of absence from Senator Specter’s office to join his Marine Corps reserve unit in Iraq, where he was a senior officer in the volatile Al Anbar province. Among his accomplishments in Iraq were participating in the planning and execution of the second battle for Fallujah, coordinating the post-battle assessment of the city’s infrastructure, and being named the senior civil affairs and reconstruction advisor to the province’s Iraqi governor.

MONTCLAIR HONORED The Florida Department of Education recognized Montclair Elementary as one of its high performing schools. The school improved from an “F” to an “A” this past school year.

Education Commissioner John L. Winn also recognized Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties for having consistently earned an “A” grade since the inception of district grades. The two districts had all “A” and “B” graded schools in 2011.

“It is my pleasure to honor these high-performing districts and schools for the incredible work they do to ensure our students are being prepared for success in life,” said Commissioner Winn in a press release. “Achieving these kinds of results takes a coordinated effort at all levels, and I couldn’t be more proud of what these students, teachers, school leaders and other dedicated stakeholders were able to accomplish during the last school year.”